5 reasons to use Firefox over Chrome

5 reasons to use Firefox over Chrome

When it comes to internet browsers, there are two clear leaders: Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. Each has its own quirks and it’s not unusual to use both for various reasons. However, if you only want to choose one right now, we’ll give you 5 reasons to use Firefox over Chrome.

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Mozilla Firefox Quantum is a free, open-source web browser that offers numerous features and customization options. Its performance is excellent, and it's designed to protect your privacy.

Privacy

With the current mass hysteria regarding privacy, especially after Facebook’s scandals, having a browser like Mozilla Firefox is a complete guarantee of privacy. The program is open-source, so it doesn’t have a multinational company behind it trying to monitor our every movement. So, that’s a plus for Firefox.

By the way, we should add that the browser has important tools when it comes to privacy. They have small apps or extensions available that can be added to enhance privacy.

Consuming fewer resources

This is by far Google Chrome’s weak spot and where Firefox comes out on top: the resources it consumes. If you open the task manager while you’re using Google Chrome with a few tabs, pay attention to the processes. Almost certainly, you’ll have several fields dedicated exclusively to the Google browser. That absolutely kills performance.

Both Firefox and Google Chrome have multiprocessing, but the difference is that while Google Chrome opens one process per tab, Firefox allows three tabs per process. This makes a subtle (but significant) difference.

Tabs

In the previous point, we mentioned that Google Chrome consumes lots of processes due to open tabs. Now, let’s talk about this at the design level. We like the format of Google Chrome more than Firefox, but it has a problem: when many tabs are loaded… it’s impossible to see each one. Mozilla, on the other hand, has a nice horizontal scroll that lets you always see what’s on screen.

Google could learn a thing or two about how the most famous fox on the internet handles tabs. 

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Extensions galore

There was a time when Google Chrome was the leader in extensions. However, in recent years, it hasn’t completely kept its place. Firefox has managed both to offer the same (or more) extensions and also maintain high-quality thanks to its community following.

We should also add that many extensions are crossovers, so they will work between browsers problem-free.

Synchronization

We won’t mislead you: if there’s one good thing about Google Chrome, it’s that all of Google’s tools are masterfully interconnected. Luckily, Firefox has gone to work on this issue in latest versions and the synchronization between browsers now works reliably.

Thanks to this, all the content on your PC can be seen later on your cell phone (or other devices, of course). Also, you can use Google’s extensions to get more out of it.

Ultimately, your choice of browser is up to you, but if you’ve tossed Firefox aside for the last few years, it’s worth another look.

 

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