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You can block annoying WhatsApp contacts much easier

You can block annoying WhatsApp contacts much easier
Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

According to WhatsApp news source WABetaInfo, WhatsApp is introducing new shortcuts that allow users to block other users. The feature is currently being tested by select beta testers and will soon be available to some iOS beta testers. WABetaInfo released the screenshot above in order to give users insight into what the shortcuts are expected to look like. 

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WhatsApp is making it easier to block annoying contacts

Upon the feature’s release, users will have access to three new shortcuts that make it easier to block contacts. The first shortcut (an arrow pointing to the left) is found in the context menu under the chat preview, but it is not visible for group chats. The second shortcut (an arrow pointing to the right) is located in the chat options, and the third shortcut (an arrow pointing upwards) appears when a message is received from an unknown contact with whom the user has never chatted before.

Regardless of the shortcut used, WhatsApp will prompt the user to report the number as well. To do this, the user will have to forward the last five messages from that number to WhatsApp’s content moderation team. If, based on the report, the team finds that there has been a violation, it may ban the account.

As has previously been the case, the feature is currently only available for beta testing on iOS devices. In order to gain access to the new feature, you’ll need to get the latest WhatsApp beta version from the TestFlight app. We expect the feature to be made available for beta testing on Android in the near future. 

Once it’s released, you’ll simply need to join the WhatsApp beta program and download the latest update for the app from your chosen mobile app repository. Alternatively, you could download the WhatsApp Beta APK from our website. It’s free and 100% safe.

Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

I hail from the awe-inspiring beauty of South Africa. Born and raised in Pretoria, I've always had a deep interest in local history, particularly conflicts, architecture, and our country's rich past of being a plaything for European aristocracy. 'Tis an attempt at humor. My interest in history has since translated into hours at a time researching everything from the many reasons the Titanic sank (really, it's a wonder she ever left Belfast) to why Minecraft is such a feat of human technological accomplishment. I am an avid video gamer (Sims 4 definitely counts as video gaming, I checked) and particularly enjoy playing the part of a relatively benign overlord in Minecraft. I enjoy the diverse experiences gaming offers the player. Within the space of a few hours, a player can go from having a career as an interior decorator in Sims, to training as an archer under Niruin in Skyrim. I believe video games have so much more to teach humanity about community, kindness, and loyalty, and I enjoy the opportunity to bring concepts of the like into literary pieces.

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