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 Robots replacing reality TV hosts in Milf Manor

 Robots replacing reality TV hosts in Milf Manor
Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

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MILF Manor is a reality TV program begging to be discussed and analyzed on the internet. The show’s title and setup of mothers and their sons competing in the same dating pool is so outrageous, it borders on being normal. The contestants are even asked to participate in a blindfolded contest to identify their sons by their abs alone. However, it looks like robots are now coming into play.

Robots replacing reality tv hosts milf manor

One of the most interesting aspects of the show is the absence of a traditional host. Instead, the contestants receive alerts and directions via text messages on iPhones provided by the producers. In a trend noticed on other reality TV shows, there’s no actual human host. 

The Circle, a show on Netflix, set off the trend in 2020. The show consists of contestants who compete to create the most popular social media presence while living in isolation. They receive tasks and challenges through television in their living quarters. A more recent show on Netflix called Pressure Cooker, takes this concept a step further by replacing the host with a kitchen printer that sends out challenges and voting results. 

The Button, a YouTube series produced by Cut, takes it even further by featuring a large talking button that provides comedic prompts and awkward questions for the daters until one of them presses it, signalling the end of the date and bringing in a new match.

The removal of the host role in these shows may be a cost-saving measure as reality TV competition shows are known for being budget-friendly to produce. Additionally, it could be that the role of reality TV host is not as attractive to high-profile figures as it once was. In the past, well-known personalities such as Tyra Banks, Mario Lopez, and Donald Trump were frequently seen as hosts, but this is no longer the case. 

Robots replacing reality tv hosts milf manor

This trend could also indicate a shift in the way audiences view reality TV, and the need for a host figure may not be seen as important or necessary in the current climate.

Even though these examples above are far more benign than AI controlling a group of humans in a reality show, this trend may speak to a dystopian future where that could actually happen. Or, a future where AI and robots take over the entertainment industry entirely. We’ve already seen AI, like Microsoft’s controversial Tay, break into the social media entertainment space.

Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

I hail from the awe-inspiring beauty of South Africa. Born and raised in Pretoria, I've always had a deep interest in local history, particularly conflicts, architecture, and our country's rich past of being a plaything for European aristocracy. 'Tis an attempt at humor. My interest in history has since translated into hours at a time researching everything from the many reasons the Titanic sank (really, it's a wonder she ever left Belfast) to why Minecraft is such a feat of human technological accomplishment. I am an avid video gamer (Sims 4 definitely counts as video gaming, I checked) and particularly enjoy playing the part of a relatively benign overlord in Minecraft. I enjoy the diverse experiences gaming offers the player. Within the space of a few hours, a player can go from having a career as an interior decorator in Sims, to training as an archer under Niruin in Skyrim. I believe video games have so much more to teach humanity about community, kindness, and loyalty, and I enjoy the opportunity to bring concepts of the like into literary pieces.

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