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What can we expect from Windows 12?

What can we expect from Windows 12?
Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

Shortly after Windows 11 was released, rumors started circulating that it was to be the final version of the software. Now, obviously, this is a little short-sighted, but it speaks to the belief that consumers had that Microsoft had finally got it right, that it had finally washed out the poor taste that Windows 8 left in users’ mouths. 

Now though, we have confirmation that Windows 12 is on its way and is expected to release around the end of 2024. However, we haven’t really received any information about features or what the interface is going to look like yet. Luckily, there’s a fan-made Windows 12 concept that could probably shed light on what the OS could look like. 

The first major feature that the concept showcases is the reworked Widgets interface. This is basically a wet dream for anyone wishing that Microsoft would give us a Widgets interface we don’t abjectly hate. Widgets are not a new feature in OS interfaces, and this concept is far more dynamic with more features we actually need and no spammy news that no one asked for. Below you can see the stunning layout of all the most essential Widgets as well as a peak at the floating taskbar. 

Is this what Windows 12 will look like

Another incredible sight to behold is the reworked dock with all your most used controls. In this concept, the control panel is expanded from a separate floating portion of the taskbar. Microsoft could seriously learn a thing or two from this concept. It perfectly uses the available space without leading to a crowded cramped home screen. The designer has managed to achieve this without altering the Windows design language any more than it likely will change in the next version. There’s a clear connection here between Windows 11 as it is and this concept. It’s an incredible feat. 

Is this what Windows 12 will look like

Windows OS concepts are common if you know where to look, but the creator of this particular exploration has gone to so much effort to combine novel functionality with a familiar aesthetic. Hopefully, the people who are creating the end-user Windows 12 experience are paying attention to concepts like this, if only for inspiration. We’re obviously not going to get a carbon copy of this exploration as the final software, not by a long shot, most likely. But it’s certainly fun to dream about. 

In any event, while Windows may not be the most adaptable or customizable OS out there, such systems do exist. With effort, someone could recreate this fictional Windows 12 for a system like Linux. Until then, all we can do is hope that when Windows 12 releases, it’s functional, intuitive, and familiar.

Russell Kidson

Russell Kidson

I hail from the awe-inspiring beauty of South Africa. Born and raised in Pretoria, I've always had a deep interest in local history, particularly conflicts, architecture, and our country's rich past of being a plaything for European aristocracy. 'Tis an attempt at humor. My interest in history has since translated into hours at a time researching everything from the many reasons the Titanic sank (really, it's a wonder she ever left Belfast) to why Minecraft is such a feat of human technological accomplishment. I am an avid video gamer (Sims 4 definitely counts as video gaming, I checked) and particularly enjoy playing the part of a relatively benign overlord in Minecraft. I enjoy the diverse experiences gaming offers the player. Within the space of a few hours, a player can go from having a career as an interior decorator in Sims, to training as an archer under Niruin in Skyrim. I believe video games have so much more to teach humanity about community, kindness, and loyalty, and I enjoy the opportunity to bring concepts of the like into literary pieces.

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